Satan’s Whiskers—From The Essential Bar Book by Jenny Fiedler

A handsome and comprehensive bartending guide for professional and home bartenders that includes history, lore, and 150 recipes, The Essential Bar Book  is full of indispensable information about everything boozy that’s good to drink. This easy-to-navigate A-to-Z guide covers it all, from the tools of the trade to the history and mythology behind classic and modern drinks, and features 115 recipes for the world’s most important cocktails.

EssentialBarBook

Reprinted with permission from  The Essential Bar Book by Jennifer Fiedler, copyright © 2014. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House LLC. Please support your local bookstore or purchase through our affiliate links with IndieBound and Amazon.

SatansWhiskers1

Photo credit: specsatascocita.blogspot.com

Satan’s Whiskers

Serves one

Despite the titillating name, this classic 1930s-era cocktail runs relatively tame. First recorded in Harry Craddock’s Savoy Cocktail Book , the recipe calls for equal parts gin and dry and sweet vermouths dressed up with a sunny dose of citrus in the form of Grand Marnier, orange juice, and orange bitters. A variation using curaçao instead of Grand Marnier is described as “curled” as opposed to “straight.”

Ingredients:

1/2 ounce gin
1/2 ounce sweet vermouth
1/2 ounce dry vermouth
1/4 ounce Grand Marnier or orange
curaçao
1/2 ounce fresh orange juice
3 dashes orange bitters

Garnish: orange peel

Glassware: cocktail or coupe

Add all ingredients to a cocktail shaker. Add ice and shake until chilled. Strain into a chilled cocktail or coupe glass. Garnish with an orange peel.

Photo credit: chow.com

Photo credit: chow.com

 

JennyFiedler
A contributing editor to 
Wine Spectator, Jennifer Fiedler writes WineSpectator.com’s biweekly food and wine pairing column 8 & $20 and covers wine collecting, auctions, Q&As, and design for the magazine. She was a co-author of  Brooklyn Beer Shop’s Beer Making Book , and has a degree in English from Yale University and a Grande Diplome from the French Culinary Institute in New York City.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s