SPACE ODYSSEY: Stanley Kubrick, Arthur C. Clarke, and the Making of a Masterpiece 

An excerpt by Michael Benson

Space Odyssey.jpgMy own lifelong engagement with 2001 started in the spring of 1968 at the age of six. My mom, a confirmed Clarke fan, took me to an afternoon matinee within weeks of the film’s premiere. Whether it was in Washington (where we then lived) or New York (as I remember it) is unclear. While I was already excited by the jump into space as then best represented by the Apollo program—which had already launched two of its towering Saturn V Moon rockets on unmanned test flights—it was no preparation for my first exposure to such a powerfully ambiguous, visually stunning work.

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THE LEBANESE FOOD TRUCK THAT COULD- A Movie and Delicious Recipes

by Gary Meyer

Earlier this year we were lucky enough to see a truly inspiring movie about female empowerment against the odds with gorgeous plates of studded pilafs, mouth-watering freekeh dishes and stuffed grape leaves in Thomas Morgan’s SOUFRA.

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In the midst of a successful film festival tour where it keeps winning awards, a beautiful cookbook has been published with many recipes you will want to try. And we are bringing a couple to you on EatDrinkFilms.

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THE PUPPET MASTER: The Films of Jiří Trnka

by Carlos Valladares

Jean Cocteau said of Jiří Trnka, the Czech animator and puppeteer, that the very name conjures up childhood and poetry. Note the “and”—childhood and poetry, la poésie de l’enfance, which Trnka treats with the depth and respect those oft-belittled years merit. We are only too quick to gloss over our fanciful kid dreams, our stumbling attempts to use simple words to convey huge emotions which we spend our adult trying to refine and intellectualize and know, know, boringly know.

Image result for Jiří Trnka - A Missing Friend | TrailerTrnka, by contrast, was a seer, a dweller. He dwelled in youth, dwelled in the crevices of language before social and linguistic codes are mastered (most of his films’ narratives lose you along the way, and that’s when you know they’re working). His magic is the magic of the slow burn, the way the worlds of imperial China or a rose-wrapped Greek forest unfurl before your childlike eyes with a responsible contempt for the straight-edged story-line. Trnka’s gift—the gift, also, of Lewis Carroll, Beatrix Potter, François Truffaut, Demy in Donkey Skin mode, the late Stephen Hillenburg, and other bards of childhood—was to give kids what they most needed for maturity, a truthful artifice wrapped in a lived-in melancholy and wistfulness, and to make jaded adults see as simply as their kids again.

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A NOTE FROM THE EDITOR

Dear Friends,
If you live in the San Francisco area it is another busy weekend, especially if you love movies.NEW ITALIAN CINEMA 2018 plays Friday through Tuesday at the Vogue with new features and documentaries, three of them with food or beverage themes. And EatDrinkFilms is proud to be co-presenting. Read about them in the new issue.

Our “Shaken & Stirred” mixologist Michael Cecconi returns with a seasonal cocktail recipe and news about his Pop-Up Bar in Berkeley.

The great Czech stop-motion animator Jiri Trnka is being saluted with a wonderful series at the Berkeley Art Museum/Pacific Film Archive.  We have an article coming in a few days but not in time for the first program this Saturday, December 1.

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BITTER WAS NEVER NOT THE NEW BLACK

By Michael Cecconi

The Old World never stopped liking bitterness. I don’t know if it stems from having so many wars fought on their soil, or simply being exposed to it through permeable borders and colonialism. Americans appreciation of bitterness is limited at best. The United States is only reinforcing this flavor isolationism. I propose a tasty rebellion: drink bitter, don’t just be bitter.

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The Thistlestop is both a pun and a marriage of the U.S. (rye) and Italy (Cynar) with citrus officiating. It is dry, bitter, and yet inspires a desire for another sip. It is also easy to make, and the artichoke derived Cynar is a great guest to have at your home bar.

Let’s make a Thistlestop:

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